May 24, 2024  
2023-2024 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2023-2024 Undergraduate Bulletin

Health Sciences Professional Programs


Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Academic Programs

Director, Center for Health Sciences and Student Success: Mrs. Constance Dombroski
Premedical and Pre-Professional Programs Advisor: Ms. Debra I. Chapman

MLS Clinical Preceptors

Stacy Pond, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM, Program Director, Medical Laboratory Science, Robert Packer Hospital, Sayre, PA Christine M. Wheary, MS, MT(ASCP), Program Director, Clinical Laboratory Science, UPMC Susquehanna, Williamsport, PA;
Carol Bond, MT (ASCP), Program Director, Medical Laboratory Science, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences, Lancaster, PA;

Sherry Soost BS, MT(ASCP), CHO(NRCC),Faculty/Clinical Coordinator, Medical Laboratory Science, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences, Lancaster, PA; Lynn Jones, MSEd, MT(ASCP), Program Director, Clinical Laboratory Science Program, New York-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, NY;
Jean Buchenhorst, MS, MLS(ASCP), Program Director, Medical Laboratory Science, Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, PA;

Susanne Dannert, MS, MT(ASCP), Program Director, Medical Laboratory Science, St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children in Philadelphia, PA;

Health Sciences Committee (reports to the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences)

Linda Gutierrez, M.D., Professor of Biology
Amy Bradley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry
Debra I. Chapman, M.S., Faculty of Practice, Biology
Constance Dombroski, M.S., Director, Center for Health Sciences and Student Success
Christopher H. Henkels, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry
Lisa Kadlec, Ph.D., Professor of Biology
Kenneth M. Klemow, Ph.D., Professor and Chair of Department of Biology and Earth System Sciences
Prahlad Murthy, Ph.D., P.E., BCEE, QEP, Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Michael A. Steele, Ph.D., Professor of Biology

Wilkes University has a long-standing tradition of educating students who become health care professionals in a variety of community settings-large and small, rural and urban. The Health Sciences Programs at Wilkes provide a particularly broad and rich range of choices for entry into the medical and allied health professions.

The University’s pre-professional medical programs prepare students for careers in allopathic and osteopathic medicine, dentistry, optometry, podiatric medicine, and veterinary medicine. Pre-professional programs in allied health provide preparation for students to enter the health care professions of physical therapy, occupational therapy, clinical laboratory sciences, and physician assistant studies.

Advisement, Guidelines and Procedures for all Health Sciences Students

All Health Sciences students must declare a specific academic major and also complete a core of courses for their chosen health profession. Many pre-doctoral students major in Biology, Chemistry, Biochemistry, or Psychology. However, students who have majored in the traditional liberal arts, Math or Engineering have also been successful in gaining admission to health professions schools. Health professions schools are generally interested in students who have in-depth training in the sciences along with a broad background in the humanities and social sciences. Many students pursuing one of the allied health areas major in Biology, Psychology or one of the other traditional science or social science programs.

An important component of the University’s Health Sciences Programs is its counseling and advising system. The Wilkes tradition of close student advising permits thorough understanding of the student’s aspirations and goals. A faculty advisor is assigned to the student in his or her academic major. This academic advisor is the first point of contact regarding course planning and registration for the student. In addition, the student is counseled on the particulars of pre-doctoral and allied health education by the Health Sciences Director.

The Center for Health Sciences and Student Success specifically provides information about standards for admission to the various health professions. In addition, time lines for individual programs, admission services for health professions schools, test dates and study guides for professional school admission exams, admission deadlines, and catalogues and online resources from a variety of professional schools in the health sciences are available.

All students planning to pursue careers in the health sciences must declare their specific interest with the Wilkes Center for Health Sciences and Student Success. Students must complete a Health Sciences Declaration Form as soon as they determine their interest and submit a schedule of their classes each semester to the Center. The Declaration Form enables the Center for Health Sciences and Student Success to track the student and monitor his or her academic progress.

Health Sciences Pre-Professional Programs

These programs prepare students for health professional programs in Allopathic Medicine, Osteopathic Medicine, Dentistry, Optometry, Podiatric Medicine, and Veterinary Medicine.

Overview

Wilkes University offers premedical programs that share a fundamental and formative premise-that unprecedented technological and scientific dynamism will characterize the context of medical careers conducted in the next thirty to fifty years. This perspective has important implications for the future health professionals’ baccalaureate studies, including the need to master computer-based information access systems, to reach a level of mastery in the sciences permitting independent judgment and research, and to grow in ethical sensitivity and sophistication. Drawing on the University’s strengths in science, information systems, and the humanities, Wilkes has defined an approach to health sciences pre-professional education that produces exceptionally competent and competitive candidates for admission to the nation’s leading health professions institutions.

The Wilkes Health Sciences pre-professional graduate stands out because he or she is not only broadly trained but also has mastered the rapidly evolving medical information technologies. Throughout the science curriculum at Wilkes, students are exposed to and use databases that relate up-to-date information at the cutting edge of research in science fields. Interviews with professional school professors and admissions officers indicate that such information access skills are increasingly relevant and are essential for the health practitioner. As a comprehensive University, with a full range of bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in natural sciences, computer science, and engineering, Wilkes provides a sophisticated, research-capable science environment in which students learn how to negotiate the information-rich and highly complex world of scientific database communications.

The future health practitioner will also be called upon to assess and implement promising information emerging in the fields of molecular biology, biochemistry, cell biology, and organic chemistry. A general exposure to science at the undergraduate level, typical of universities with a liberal learning emphasis for health sciences pre-professional studies, will no longer be sufficient to prepare medical students and practitioners to be fully competent as professionals. The Wilkes science-intensive pre-professional program involves students in research projects and applications activities during their undergraduate years and helps them to gain real mastery as scientists, able to make independent judgments and to conceptualize and conduct independent research. Health care now makes obsolete the former dichotomous categorization of science and pre-professional studies, in that the superior physician will increasingly have to be a research-capable scientist. Pre-professional studies at Wilkes have adapted to this trend well in advance of programs at most other institutions.

Database information and scientific dynamism make it necessary to focus attention on the moral and ethical dimensions of pre-professional studies. Through its General Education Requirements, Wilkes provides the future health practitioner with a highly meaningful learning experience in philosophy, ethics, and social problems. These learning experiences are augmented by the robust atmosphere of intellectual discussion and debate, which has long been one of Wilkes’ distinguishing institutional characteristics, as a nondenominational, non-sectarian university at which issues of morality and ethics are taken seriously. In this way, Wilkes prepares its Health Sciences students for the real world in which they will function as broadly educated, competent professionals.

The descriptions of courses and curricula that follow put into practice what we at Wilkes believe to be a progressive program of pre-professional studies in health care careers.

Premedical Coursework and Competencies

Before applying, medical schools expect that applicants develop certain competencies through undergraduate coursework, especially in the sciences, to provide the foundation for studying medicine. Most medical schools currently require that students complete at least one year of college coursework (including both lecture and lab components) in biology, general/inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics to meet their admission requirements. Science and medicine are changing, however, and some medical schools are changing their admission requirements and how they evaluate applicants. It has been proposed that medical schools eventually move away from course-based admission requirements toward competency-based admission requirements, in order to allow greater flexibility in the types of courses that students take to prepare for medical school.

The following section outlines many of the common course requirements for admission to medical schools. Please note that there can be important variations in admissions requirements. Students should research the requirements for the schools where they intend to apply. There are several resources for researching requirements. Students can consult the individual medical school websites for information on their admission requirements. The guide produced by the Association of American Medical Colleges, Medical School Admissions Requirements, provides information on admission requirements for allopathic medical schools. The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine publishes an Osteopathic Medical College Information Book that provides information on admissions requirements for osteopathic medical schools. Students also may consult with an advisor at the Health Professions and Prelaw Center on premedical coursework.

Most medical schools will not require that you complete all required coursework before you submit the application for admission; most will simply require you to complete all required coursework before you matriculate to (enroll in) the school. However, before taking the MCAT exam you should be sure to complete the necessary coursework in the sciences and social sciences for building competencies in the areas covered on the exam.

You should not view your premedical coursework as simply part of a checklist of tasks to get out of the way before applying to medical school. You should view your premedical coursework as a means to build critical competencies that will be vitally important for the MCAT exam, success in medical school, and your future practice as a physician.

Your performance in premedical science courses will be viewed by admissions committees as a predictor of your ability

to cope with the rigorous demands of medical school. Simply earning passing grades in these courses is not sufficient. Medical schools have expectations that students who are building the necessary competencies should be able to excel in their premedical science coursework, generally earning A’s in most premedical science courses, with occasional B’s. If you are earning C’s, D’s or F’s you cannot be regarded as developing the necessary competencies for success and you may need to reevaluate whether medical school is the path for you.

For more information on the competencies required for success in medical school please see the report, “Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians.” For more information on requirements for Health Professions Schools, direction in appropriate coursework, and assistance in the application process, students should consult with the Director of the Center for Health Sciences and Student Success on a regular basis.

The Wilkes Health Sciences Pre-Professional Core


This core program is required of all students aspiring to enter programs in Allopathic Medicine, Osteopathic Medicine, Dentistry, Optometry, Podiatric Medicine, and Veterinary Medicine. The goals of the Pre-professional Core are to

  1. Help the student develop a useful scientific foundation for their selected career choice;
  2. Serve as a unique signature, which Wilkes graduates can carry forward as successful professionals; and
  3. Facilitate the preparation for standardized admissions tests such as MCAT, OAT, and DAT.

A unique feature of the university’s pre-professional education is the pre-professional core, a sequence of courses designed to prepare students for the challenges and rigors of a healthcare doctoral education. The core was developed after consulting admissions personnel from health professions schools regarding undergraduate courses required for admission. The pre-professional core not only includes the traditional requirements expected by health professional schools, but also capitalizes on the University’s strengths in science and technology.

The pre-professional core includes a meaningful research or project experience, a practicum and observation, experience provided by local health professionals, knowledge and utilization of computers in health care, meaningful laboratory background with emphasis on the understanding and use of modern instrumentation, and participation in a variety of seminars and programs offered through the Center for Health Sciences and Student Success.

Check professional schools of interest for any additional requirements.

The Wilkes Pre-Professional Core


The Wilkes Pre-professional Core Curriculum requires the following courses:

Two Courses in Physics


Two Courses in Mathematics


One Course in Computer Sciences


Two Courses in Behavioral and Social Sciences


One - Two Courses in English**


(emphasizing writing skills)

Research Course or a Special Project*


Volunteer/Community Service (Minimum 20 Hours) in Each of the Undergraduate Years


Shadowing & Patient Care Hours experience (20 hours) in Each of the Undergraduate Years


Participation in Pre-Professional Programming Through the Center for Health Science and Student Success.


NOTE:

*Pre-optometry students are also required to take MTH 150 - Elementary Statistics , BIO 327 - Medical Microbiology 

**Students enrolled in an accelerated professional program may elect to be waived from the senior year research course or special project.

Pre-Professional Core Curriculum Recommendations


The Wilkes Pre-professional Core Curriculum recommendsthe following courses (based on the recommendations of a wide variety of health professional school programs):

Three Additional Courses in Biology

One Additional Course in Mathematics

Pre-Dental Students Recommendations


Pre-dental students are also recommended to take

Pre-Veterinary Students Recommendations


Pre-veterinary students are also recommended to take

Pre-Requisites


Pre-requisites vary from one health professions school to another. It is the student’s responsibility to meet the requirements of a particular health professions school.

All students intending to enter doctoral programs in heath care must complete these pre-professional core courses. Students should work with their academic advisors and the Health Sciences Director to integrate this core into the recommended course sequence for their academic major as outlined in this bulletin.

Letter of Evaluation


Students applying to a health professions school may request a Letter of Evaluation from the Wilkes Health Sciences Committee. In order to receive the Letter of Evaluation from the Committee, students must have a Declaration Form on file, successfully complete the Pre-professional Core, develop knowledge of and experience in the field they wish to enter through shadowing, and gain experience in the social service field by volunteering their time with community agencies. These types of experiences are required by health professions schools. The application for the committee letter must be submitted to the Health Sciences Committee by April 1stof a student’s intended year of health professional school application.

Placement of Pre-Doctoral Students


Wilkes enjoys an enviable record of placement of students in health professions schools with acceptance rates of about 90%. Allopathic medical schools accepting Wilkes students include the Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine (previously known as The Commonwealth Medical College), George Washington, Georgetown, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Drexel University, Pennsylvania State University-Hershey, Stanford, SUNY Upstate, Temple University, Thomas Jefferson University, Tulane, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Pittsburgh, and Yale. A number of Wilkes students also enter osteopathic medical schools such as Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine, and University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine in Kansas City, MO.

Wilkes students have attended dental school at the University of Connecticut, Tufts University, the University of Pittsburgh the University of Buffalo School of Dental Medicine, and Temple University Kornberg School of Dentistry. Pre-optometry students have gained admission to institutions such as Illinois College of Optometry, New England College of Optometry, Ohio State University College of Optometry, and Pennsylvania College of Optometry at Salus University. Podiatric medical schools accepting Wilkes students include California College of Podiatric Medicine, New York College of Podiatric Medicine, Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, and Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine. Wilkes students have also gained admission to veterinary schools such as the Oklahoma State University School of Veterinary Medicine, the University of Illinois School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, the University of Wisconsin-Madison Veterinary School, and the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine.

Affiliated Degree Programs in Medicine


Early Assurance B.S./M.D. Program in Allopathic Medicine


Wilkes has developed special early assurance joint B.S.-M.D. degree program and established agreements with major Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine at Hershey, which leads to a baccalaureate degree from Wilkes University and a medical degree from Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine at Hershey . Once students have been granted acceptance to Wilkes University and identified as qualified to be considered for selection for the early assurance program, they will be required to submit letters from two high school science teachers and one humanities/English teacher to the Health Sciences Committee and successfully complete three interviews. If ultimately selected for the program, students must satisfy all requirements as articulated in the specific affiliation agreement. All students in the early assurance program will spend their 7th or 8th semester in a clinical setting. Wilkes University has established special affiliations with Guthrie Health Systems (GHS), which includes the Robert Packer Medical Center in Sayre, Pennsylvania(Guthrie Scholars), for students to participate in this clinical experience.

The Premedical Scholars Program with the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine at Hershey


The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine at Hershey (Penn State Hershey) and Wilkes University offer a special Premedical Scholars Program for outstanding high school seniors from rural or medically underserved areas of Pennsylvania who must be interested in a career in primary care medicine. This program allows students to participate in the Guthrie Scholars Clinical Semester for their senior year clinical experience.

The program allows high school seniors to be assured admission to the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine at Hershey as they enter Wilkes University to pursue undergraduate study. Details of this program are as follows:

  • Program Admission
    • To be considered for selection to the Penn State Hershey Premedical Scholars BS/MD Program, applicants must meet the following conditions:
    • be accepted into the entering freshman class at Wilkes University by November of their senior year in high school;
    • have a high GPA;
    • rank in the top 10% of their high school graduating class;
    • have satisfactorily completed three (3) years of natural sciences, including biology, chemistry, and physics, and mathematics through trigonometry (calculus is recommended);
    • have had at least one shadowing experience(preferably with a primary care or general practice physician);
    • have a strong understanding of the medical field and what is involved in being a physician.
    • Once students have been accepted to Wilkes University, the Wilkes Center for Health Sciences and Student Success will notify students who meet minimal qualification criteria for selection to this early assurance program. To be selected, students are required to successfully complete interviews at Wilkes, at Robert Packer Medical Center of the Guthrie Health Care System and at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine.
    • Emphasis in recruiting will be placed on students from rural or medically underserved areas of Pennsylvania who wish to pursue a career in primary care medicine.
    • Successful applicants should expect to be interviewed at Wilkes in December of their senior year of high school. Finalists from this interview will be called to subsequent interviews in February and March of their senior year of high school.
    • Final selection for this program is at the discretion of the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine at Hershey.
    • Program Format:
    • Four (4) years of successful undergraduate study at Wilkes University, which includes completion of an academic major and the Pre-professional Core. Students must maintain a minimum of 3.5in biology, chemistry, and physics and an overall GPA of at least 3.5 by the end of their junior year at Wilkes. Specific criteria by year are as follows:
      • Freshman Year
        • Minimum GPA of 3.3
  • Sophomore Year
    • Minimum GPA of 3.4
    • Shadowing experience with a primary care physician
    • Meet with the Associate Dean for Admissions and Student Affairs of the Pennsylvania State College of Medicine
  • Junior Year
    • Minimum GPA in biology, chemistry, and physics of3.5 and a minimum overall GPA of 3.5
    • A second shadowing experience with a primary care physician
    • A Letter of Evaluation from the Health Sciences Committee at Wilkes University
    • Completion of the MCAT; MCAT score must meet expectations of the Admissions Committee at Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine at Hershey
    • Completion of the AMCAS application
  • Senior Year
    • Maintain a high level of academic achievement and complete Wilkes pre-medical core
    • Participate in Guthrie Clinical Semester
    • Meet with Associate Dean for Admissions and Student Affairs of the Pennsylvania College of Medicine in the fall of Senior year

Early Interview Assurance Program in Medicine


Wilkes has developed special Early Interview Assurance Programs and established agreements with Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine and Philadelphia College of Medicine (PCOM). Once students have been granted acceptance to Wilkes University and identified as qualified to be considered for selection for an early interview assurance program, they will be required to submit letters from two high school science teachers and one humanities/English teacher to the Center for Health Sciences and Student Success. Students must satisfy all requirements as articulated in the specific affiliation agreement. Students should work with their academic advisors and the Health Sciences Director.

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine at Scranton, PA


Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine at Scranton, PA and Wilkes University have developed a special Early Interview Assurance Program with Wilkes University. This program allows Wilkes University students that meet all of the following criteria to receive an interview for the allopathic medical degree program.

  • Program Admission
    • Students should have a high GPA and high rank in their high school graduating class
    • Student must be from Lackawanna or LuzerneCounty.
    • Guaranteed interview will be contingent upon the following:
      • Submitting an AMCAS application to GeisingerCommonwealth in the year preceding desired entry as a first-year medical student.
      • Submitting the Geisinger Commonwealth secondary application in the year preceding desired entry as a first-year medical student.
      • Achieving a cumulative grade point average(GPA) of at least a 3.5 on a scale of 4.00 in biology, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, and physics (and any other required course determined by Geisinger Commonwealth) at Wilkes University.
      • Achieving a cumulative grade point average(GPA) of at least a 3.5 on a scale of 4.00 in the sciences courses at Wilkes University.
      • Achieving a cumulative GPA of at least 3.5 for all courses completed at Wilkes University.
      • Having no grade in any course below a “C” at Wilkes University.
      • Achieving a score of 509 or higher on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) with a score of at least 126 in each section. Additionally, Geisinger Commonwealth will consider previous MCAT results if they are within three years of the date of application and the student has scored a 30 or higher with a score of at least 8 in each section.
      • Submitting a committee letter endorsing the candidate from the faculty at Wilkes University.

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) at Philadelphia, PA


Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) at Philadelphia, PA and Wilkes University have developed a special Early Interview Assurance Program with Wilkes University. This program allows Wilkes University students that meet all of the following criteria to receive an interview for the osteopathic medical degree program.

  • Program Admission
    • Students should have a high GPA and high rank in their high school graduating class
    • Guaranteed interview will be contingent upon the following:
      • The candidate must complete the undergraduate course requirements as listed in PCOM’s catalog.
      • The candidate must have earned (on the 4.0grading system) a grade point average of at least 3.75 through the end of the sophomore year at University for the 3+4 program or a grade point average of 3.25 through the end of junior year for the 4+4 program.
      • The candidate must take the Medical College Admissions Test as early as possible but no later than the fall of the senior year (based on program of interest). The candidate must earn a minimum score of the fiftieth percentile (50%) in each section of the MCAT.
      • The candidate must also submit an application to PCOM through AACOMAS no later than October 31st of the senior year and submit the PCOM Supplemental Application(with application fee) no later than November30th of the senior year.
      • The candidate must submit a letter of recommendation from an Osteopathic Physician (D.O.).

Affiliated Accelerated Health Professions Programs


In addition to the traditional four-year premedical undergraduate programs, Wilkes University has maintained affiliations with health professions schools in osteopathic medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine and physical therapy education for many years. These accelerated programs permit students to spend three years at Wilkes in the basic sciences and liberal arts and four years at the affiliated health professions school. The University has developed these seven-year health professions programs with the following institutions:

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM)

Pennsylvania College of Optometry at Salus University (PCO)

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSP)

Widener University Institute for Physical Therapy Education (WU-IPTE)

These programs offer a unique opportunity for outstanding high school students, who are fairly certain of the career path they wish to pursue, to complete their pre-professional and professional education in seven years. Students should have a high GPA and high rank in their high school graduating class, and should have completed Honors or AP course work, especially in the sciences.

In order to qualify for any of these seven-year programs, students must apply and be accepted to Wilkes University by January of their senior year in high school. If minimum prerequisites are met and students are accepted to the University, they will be interviewed by representatives of the Wilkes University Health Sciences Committee for final selection.

Once students are selected for one of these affiliated programs and begin their undergraduate education, they will receive assistance from the Center for Health Sciences and Student Success in advising them through their accelerated program of study and in the application process to the health profession school. Students must complete all general education requirements, academic major requirements and requirements associated with the program of interest during their three years at Wilkes. They will also be expected to maintain a high GPA and are required to participate in shadowing experiences, volunteer activities, and seminars and programs sponsored by the Center for Health Sciences and Student Success during their three years at Wilkes.

Wilkes University students must apply for and receive a Health Sciences Committee Letter of Evaluation after their sophomore year in order to apply to any of the accelerated programs. Only students who have earned a high grade point average by the end of their sophomore year and who have fulfilled appropriate requirements of the Pre-professional Core and the General Education Curriculum will be endorsed and receive a Letter of Evaluation for the accelerated program of interest. Students whose academic credentials fall below the standards set by the Committee will be advised to complete a third year of study at Wilkes before reapplying for a Letter of Evaluation. Students must meet all admission requirements as outlined by the health professions schools with the final admission decision determined by the health professions institution.

Students will go through the formal professional school application process for their accelerated program of interest following the completion of their sophomore year. Qualified students will then be notified by their professional school of interest of the guaranteed interview date.

If accepted by the professional school, following successful completion of his/her first year of basic science education in professional school, a student is responsible for transferring the credits earned at the professional school to Wilkes and Wilkes will confer upon each student the Wilkes University baccalaureate degree.

If not accepted by professional school, students will become traditional, 4-year students at Wilkes University. Students will apply to any programs of choice following the completion of their junior year.

Students must fulfill the course requirements as follows in additional to any additional items outlines by the individual professional institution.

Seven-Year Programs with a Major in Biology-Required Courses and Recommended Course Sequence


The Wilkes Accelerated Pre-Professional Program Core Curriculum requires the following courses:

Seven Courses in Biology


One Course in Computer Sciences


Three Courses in Behavioral and Social Sciences


One Course in English


One Course in FYF


One Free Elective Course


15 Credits of Distribution Requirements


NOTE:


*Select one course from the Structural and Functional Biology category and one course from the Diversity and Population Biology category.

Pre-Optometry Students must also take BIO 327 - Medical Microbiology 

Visit Center for Health Sciences & Student Success for recommended course sequence.

Transfer Doctoral Degree Programs


The transfer program is similar to the Seven-Year Affiliated Degree programs. However, instead of choosing this 3+4 track before entering Wilkes University as a freshman (as in the 3+4programs), a student may elect this path during their tenure as an undergraduate student.

Typically, four (4) years of undergraduate study are required to qualify for the bachelor’s degree. Wilkes University makes an exception to this requirement in special circumstances for doctoral students in osteopathic medicine, dentistry, optometry, podiatric medicine, and doctoral level physical therapy (DPT).

These students may, with the approval of the Wilkes University Academic Standards Committee, satisfy the requirements for the bachelor’s degree by completing three years of an academic major, at least the last two of which must be at Wilkes, and by requesting credit toward the degree for their first two years of work in a professional school. Students in these programs must, however, satisfy the General Education Curriculum requirements at Wilkes University in order to be considered for a bachelor’s degree from the University.

Such students must also petition the Academic Standards Committee for permission to graduate, submit official transcripts from the professional school, and pay the usual graduation fees. In all cases, the final approval for the granting of the baccalaureate degree rests with the Academic Standards Committee of Wilkes University.

Recommended Course Sequence


Recommended Course Sequence: Although very rigorous, this sequence will assist accelerated students in preparation for the MCAT and medical school. SOC 101, PSY 101 and MTH 150 - Complete courses before the start of 4th semester; complete all other courses to graduate.

First Summer (prior to traditional fall start)


Fifth Semester


BIO Elective(s) - 300-level

Sixth Semester


BIO Elective(s) - 300-level

Allied Health Programs


Wilkes University has developed programs that prepare students for admission to physical therapy and occupational therapy schools as well as programs in medical laboratory sciences.

With career opportunities expanding in the allied health fields known as physical therapy, occupational therapy, clinical laboratory sciences, physician assistant, and chiropractic medicine, admission to programs in these areas has become increasingly competitive. Wilkes University has defined an approach to pre-allied health education to produce competitive, noteworthy candidates for admission.

The University has structured a program of study emphasizing the basic sciences and social sciences to provide students with the appropriate background knowledge to enter occupational and physical therapy programs. The curriculum is complemented by an advising system that closely monitors the student’s academic progress and their application process to a professional program.

Students interested in allied health fields must meet with their academic advisors and advisors from the Health Sciences Director early in their freshman year to work out an individualized course of study. It is important to look at professional programs in these areas because there is no set standard of prerequisites for all programs. By choosing schools to which a student may want to apply, the Health Science Director can help to make sure he or she meets the prerequisites of a particular program in order to be a viable candidate when applying to the professional school. Students may plan to apply to a pre-professional undergraduate program in physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistant, and chiropractic medicine after two or three years of course work at Wilkes. Student may also plan to complete an undergraduate degree at Wilkes and apply to an entry-level allied health master’s or doctoral degree program. Career plans affect course selection and must be reviewed with academic and health sciences advisors.

Medical Laboratory Sciences (Medical Technology)


Total minimum number of credits required for a major in Medical Laboratory Science (Medical Technology) leading to the B.S. degree - 120.

The Board of Certification of Medical Technology, part of the American Society for Clinical Pathology, recommends certain requirements for a program of training leading to the B.S. degree in Medical Laboratory Science. The curriculum offered at Wilkes University follows these recommendations and is presented below.

At the completion of three years, the student may be accepted by an affiliated program of medical technology for a period of twelve months of clinical training. Following graduation from the programs, the students will received the B.S. degree in Medical Laboratory Science from Wilkes University and will be eligible for certification as a Medical Technologist by the Board of Registry of Medical Technology or as a Clinical Laboratory Scientist by the National Certification Agency for Medical Laboratory Personnel.

Wilkes University has established formal affiliations with a variety of MLS programs including Robert Packer Hospital in Sayre, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, PA College of Health Sciences at Lancaster General Hospital in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and NY Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital in Brooklyn, New York, Fulfillment of the fourth year requirement at non-affiliated NACCLS certified hospital programs may be arranged by agreement between the program and Wilkes University.

Required Courses and Recommended Course Sequence


Total Credits: 15

Second Semester


Total Credits: 15

Third Semester


Total Credits: 14

Fourth Semester


Total Credits: 14

Fifth Semester


Total Credits: 16

Sixth Semester


Total Credits: 16

Seventh and Eighth Semesters


CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES PROFESSIONAL STUDY YEAR

The 30 credits supplied by the twelve months of clinical training are divided into the following courses:

  • BIO 371 - ClinicalMicrobiology Credits: 7
  • BIO 372 - ClinicalChemistry Credits: 8
  • BIO 373 - ClinicalHematology & Coagulation Credits: 5
  • BIO 374 - ClinicalImmunohematology Credits: 4
  • BIO 375 - ClinicalImmunology & Serology Credits: 3
  • BIO 376 - Clinical Seminar Credits: 3
Total Credits: 30

Total Credits: 120


Occupational Therapy


Occupational therapists work with members of the community who encounter difficulties with tasks of living. These difficulties may be from developmental deficits, the aging process, physical illness or injury, economic stress, cultural differences, or psychological problems. Occupational therapists provide services along with other health professionals in a number of different settings ranging from hospitals and clinics to schools to reach a wide population of all ages.

The Wilkes Pre-Occupational Therapy Core

In addition to completing an academic major, each student must also complete the Wilkes University Pre-Occupational Therapy Core. The Pre-Occupational Therapy Core provides a base from which students can structure their classes. The Pre-Occupational Therapy Core includes a sequence of courses identified by the American Association of Occupational Therapy Schools as common prerequisites at most occupational therapy schools. It must be emphasized that there are no universal prerequisite courses for all existing occupational therapy programs.

American Occupational Therapy Association: www.aota.org

The Wilkes Pre-Occupational Therapy


The Wilkes Pre-Occupational Therapy Core Curriculum requires the following courses:

Two Courses in Biology


One Course in Mathematics


One Course in English


  • ENG Elective

One Course in Sociology


One Course in Computer Science


Cooperative Education or Internship


The Wilkes Pre-Occupational Therapy Core Curriculum Recommendations


The Wilkes Pre-Occupational Therapy Core Curriculum recommends the following courses (based on the recommendations of a wide variety of Occupational Therapy programs):

Two Additional Courses in Biology


One Additional Course in Sociology


One Additional Course in Psychology


  • PSY Elective

One Medical Terminology Course


  • Visit Center for Health Sciences & Student Success for more information

NOTE:


Pre-requisites vary from one Occupational Therapy program to another. It is the student’s responsibility to meet the requirements of a particular Occupational Therapy program.

Minimum 100 hours through work or volunteer experience sin a clinical setting (observation hour requirements vary by Occupational Therapy program)

Physical Therapy


Physical Therapy is a profession concerned with restoration of physical function and the prevention of disability following disease, injury, or loss of body parts. The goal of physical therapy is to help the patient reach maximum potential and toa place in society while learning to live within the limits of his or her capabilities.

Physical therapists are qualified to utilize such physical agents as therapeutic heat, light, electricity, water, exercise, or massage in treating patients. Treatment may consist of teaching the patient an exercise regimen to increase muscle power or to improve coordination, or teaching the patient to walk with prostheses, braces, or other ambulatory aids. Appropriate psychological and sociological principles are applied in motivating and instructing the patient, his or her family, and others. Physical therapists may delegate selected forms of treatment to supportive personnel with assumption of the responsibilities for the care of the patient and the continuing supervision of the supportive personnel.

Career opportunities exist for physical therapists in hospitals, rehabilitation centers, pediatric facilities, private practice, research, industry, sports medicine, school systems, nursing homes, and other health care settings.

Wilkes Pre-Physical Therapy Core


In addition to completing an academic major, each student must also complete the Wilkes University Pre-PhysicalTherapy Core, which provides a base from which students can structure their classes. The Pre-Physical Therapy Core includes a sequence of courses that are common prerequisites at most physical therapy schools. It must be emphasized that there are no universal prerequisite course for all physical therapy programs. Therefore, students must consult with each school to which they seek admission to ascertain that particular school’s prerequisites: www.apta.org.

The Wilkes Pre-Physical Therapy Core Curriculum requires the following courses:

Five-Six Courses in Biology


Two Courses in Chemistry with Laboratory


One Course in Physics


(although both courses are highly recommended)

Two Courses in Psychology


Two Courses in English

One Course in Sociology

One Course in Mathematics

The Wilkes Pre-Physical Therapy Core Curriculum Recommendations


The Wilkes Pre-Physical Therapy Core Curriculum recommends the following courses (based on the recommendations of a wide variety of Physical Therapy programs):

Two Additional Courses in Biology

One Additional Course in Psychology

  • PSY Elective
One Medical Terminology Course

  • Visit Center for Health Sciences & Student Success for more information

NOTE:


Pre-requisites vary from one Physical Therapy program to another. It is the student’s responsibility to meet the requirements of a particular Physical Therapy program.

Affiliated Accelerated Program with Widener University: Doctor of Physical Therapy Degree


The Affiliated Physical Therapy Program provides students the opportunity to move on from Wilkes University to the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at Widener University to earn a joint 3+3 B.S.-D.P.T. degree. Students must submit an official transcript to Wilkes University after completing their first year in the physical therapy program in order to receive a Wilkes Baccalaureate degree. Selected students able to meet or exceed established criteria will be eligible for a guaranteed place in the Widener Physical Therapy Program. Students will also be given the opportunity to earn a joint 4+3 B.S.-D.P.T. degree.

Students should consult the previous section of this bulletin for prerequisite courses required by Widener University’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Program.

  • Program Admission:
    • Apply and be accepted to Wilkes University by January of senior year in high school.
    • Students should have a high GPA and high rank in their high school graduating class
  • Guaranteed interview will be contingent upon the following:
    • Complete prerequisites and maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in the undergraduate program and achieve a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.3 by the end of the fall of the junior year. The student must have at least a 3.3cumulative grade point average in order to matriculate into graduate courses in the physical therapy program.
    • Computer literacy, either by demonstration or successful completion of a computer course or challenge examination;
    • Graduate Record Exam General Test scores of 50thpercentile or better on the combined verbal and quantitative sections.
    • Evidence of volunteer service in Physical Therapy
    • three favorable letters of recommendation: one from the Wilkes University Health Sciences Committee; one from a licensed physical therapist; and one from an individual chosen by the student;
      • The selection process will include interviews with the Wilkes University Health Sciences Committee and the Widener University Department of Physical Therapy.

The selection process will include interviews with the Wilkes University Health Sciences Committee and the Widener University Department of Physical Therapy.

Physician Assistant


The average PA program takes 26.5 months to complete. The first year is generally composed of classroom studies - the essential medical sciences such as microbiology, anatomy, and physiology - followed by a year of clinical rotations in private practice and institutional settings.

A candidate must have completed a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited undergraduate college or university. Undergraduate credits must include pre-professional courses.

A candidate must have three letters of evaluation. One is from the Health Sciences Committee, one is from a professor and one is from a Physician Assistant.

Minimum 500 hours through work or volunteer experiences in a clinical setting. Students must consult with each school to which they seek admission to ascertain that particular school’s prerequisites: American Academy of Physician Assistants: www.aapa.org

The Wilkes Pre-Physician Assistant Core


The Wilkes Pre-Physician Assistant Core Curriculum requires the following courses:

Six-Seven Courses in Biology to Include the Following:


One Course in Physics:


(although both courses are highly recommended)

Two Courses in English


Three-Four Courses in Psychology


One 300 Level Psychology Course


(although both courses are highly recommended)

One Course in Sociology


Two Courses in Mathematics


The Wilkes Pre-Physician Assistant Core Curriculum Recommendations


The Wilkes Pre-Physician Assistant Core Curriculum recommends the following courses (based on the recommendations of a wide variety of Physician Assistant programs):

Two Additional Courses in Biology

One Additional Course in Mathematics

One Medical Terminology Course

  • Visit Center for Health Sciences & Student Success for more information
NOTE:

Pre-requisites vary from one Physician Assistant program to another. It is the student’s responsibility to meet the requirements of a particular Physician Assistant program.

Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Academic Programs